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Harvard Reviews of Health News


Harvard News ReviewsA team of Harvard physicians reviews health news headlines 24/7/365, and creates commentary and provides advice on how a consumer should react to the news. For urgent breaking health news, articles are written within 6-18 hours of the news story’s first appearance. If desired, they can be delivered immediately upon completion. Over 200 new articles are written annually.

Seeing Film Violence May 'Desensitize' Parents

As they watch more violence or sex in movies, parents may be less bothered by it and more likely to let their kids watch, a new study suggests. The study included 1,000 parents of children ages 6 to 17. Researchers asked them to watch 6 movie clips in random order. They included violent or sexual scenes from popular movies rated PG-13 or R. With each clip, parents were asked to pick the youngest age that would be OK for a child to see it. Most parents said the first clip they saw was OK for teens 17 or older. By the last clip, they thought a 14-year-old could see it. Researchers said they had become "desensitized" to violence and sex. Parents also were more willing to let their own children see the movies after viewing more clips. Some parents would let kids see the movies at even younger ages.

2 Nurses Get Ebola; Response under Scrutiny

In a hearing October 16, members of Congress criticized mistakes that may have allowed Ebola to spread at a Dallas hospital. Nurses Nina Pham and Amber Joy Vinson were diagnosed this week. Both took care of Thomas Eric Duncan at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital. The Liberian man died last week. Pham checked herself into the hospital when she developed a fever. Vinson flew home to Dallas from Cleveland with a low-grade fever. Tests showed both had Ebola. Vinson was sent to a special unit at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta October 15. Pham was transferred the same day to a special National Institutes of Health unit in Maryland. In testimony before Congress, a hospital official apologized for mistakes made in Duncan's case.

Psoriasis Linked to Poor Blood Pressure Control

People with severe psoriasis may have more problems with controlling high blood pressure, a new study suggests. Psoriasis causes scaly patches on the skin. Earlier research showed that people with this condition were more likely to have high blood pressure. The new study looked at more than 13,300 adults with high blood pressure. About 1,300 of them also had psoriasis. Uncontrolled high blood pressure was defined as readings of 140/90 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) or higher. Researchers adjusted their numbers to account for health conditions and other factors that affect blood pressure. They also accounted for people's use of blood pressure medicines. They found that people with severe psoriasis had a 48% higher risk of uncontrolled high blood pressure than those without it. The increased risk was about 20% for those with moderate psoriasis.

Harvard Reviews of Health News

As they watch more violence or sex in movies, parents may be less bothered by it and more likely to let their kids watch, a new study suggests. The study included 1,000 parents of children ages 6 to 17. Researchers asked them to watch 6 movie clips in random ...

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