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Harvard Reviews of Health News


Harvard News ReviewsA team of Harvard physicians reviews health news headlines 24/7/365, and creates commentary and provides advice on how a consumer should react to the news. For urgent breaking health news, articles are written within 6-18 hours of the news story’s first appearance. If desired, they can be delivered immediately upon completion. Over 200 new articles are written annually.

Foodborne Illness Stable; Salmonella Down

Though salmonella rates fell, cases of food poisoning overall have remained steady in recent years, U.S. health officials say. The new report comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It includes cases in 10 states. The CDC's reporting system confirmed 19,000 cases of foodborne illness in these states in 2013. About 4,200 people required a hospital stay. Eighty people died. Salmonella alone caused 38% of the confirmed cases. Campylobacter was close behind, with 35% of the cases. Salmonella bacteria caused 15 cases per 100,000 people. That's down 9% from 2010-2012. The CDC hopes to cut the rate to 11.4 by 2020. Campylobacter rates have been stable for the last 5 years. Vibrio bacteria are a lesser known cause of illness.

Related Health Problems Drop for Diabetics

Americans with diabetes are much less likely to develop further health problems than they were 20 years ago, a new study finds. But the actual number of people with diabetes has more than tripled. The study used data from several national surveys and databases. It found that the number of people with diabetes jumped from 6.5 million in 1990 to 20.7 million in 2010. About 95% of the cases were type 2 diabetes. This type is closely related to obesity. Diabetics are 6 times as likely to develop kidney disease as people without the disease. They are 10 times as likely to have an amputation. But rates of these and other health problems among diabetics have dropped dramatically since 1990, the study found. Heart attack rates declined nearly 70%. Deaths from extremely high blood sugar dropped 65%. Rates of amputation (leg or foot) and stroke fell about 50% each.

Sleep Apnea May Increase Osteoporosis Risk

People with sleep apnea are more likely to develop high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. But a new study finds that this common breathing disorder could also increase their risk of developing osteoporosis, a bone-thinning disease. The study took place in Taiwan. Researchers examined the medical records of close to 1,400 people diagnosed with sleep apnea from 2000 to 2008. Over the next 6 years, they kept track of how many in this group were diagnosed with osteoporosis compared to a group of over 20,000 who did not have sleep apnea. Those with sleep apnea were 2.7 times more likely to get osteoporosis. The study was published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. HealthDay News reported on it April 15.

Harvard Reviews of Health News

Though salmonella rates fell, cases of food poisoning overall have remained steady in recent years, U.S. health officials say. The new report comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It includes cases in 10 states. The CDC's reporting ...

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