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Harvard Reviews of Health News


Harvard News ReviewsA team of Harvard physicians reviews health news headlines 24/7/365, and creates commentary and provides advice on how a consumer should react to the news. For urgent breaking health news, articles are written within 6-18 hours of the news story’s first appearance. If desired, they can be delivered immediately upon completion. Over 200 new articles are written annually.

Study Links Nuts with Lower Death Rates

Eating tree nuts, peanuts and peanut butter may help people live longer, a new study suggests. The study looked at diet and death rates for more than 200,000 people. They were part of 3 long-term studies in China and the southeastern United States. The 2 Chinese studies asked people about the amount of peanuts they ate. The U.S. study asked about all nuts, but half of the nuts people ate were peanuts or peanut butter. Overall, people who ate the most nuts consumed about 2 tablespoons a day. Researchers kept track of people for 5.4 to 12.2 years, depending on the study. During follow-up, people who ate the most nuts were 20% less likely to die than those who ate the least. These numbers were adjusted to account for other things that can affect death rates, such as diabetes and smoking. Researches also looked at specific causes of death.

21% of Teen Girls Report Dating Violence

More than 1 in 5 high school girls has been physically or sexually assaulted by someone she dated, a study finds. The study was based on a government survey that is repeated every 2 years. But in 2013, researchers added an extra question about dating violence. The new question dealt specifically with sexual violence. The result was that twice as many girls reported any type of dating violence -- 21%, compared with 9% in 2011. About 10% of boys reported any assault. This was similar to the last survey. Among girls, 7% reported a physical assault and 8% reported a sexual assault by someone they dated. Among boys, 4% reported physical assault and 3% reported sexual assault. About 6% of girls and 3% of boys reported both types of assault. Most teens who had been assaulted said it happened more than once. Teens who were assaulted were more likely to do risky things.

CDC: Flu Vaccine Only 18% Effective

The flu vaccine is even less effective than health officials thought against the strain of influenza making most people sick this season. Getting the vaccine has reduced the risk of illness from the H3N2 strain of flu by only 18%, a new report says. The report comes from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Officials said earlier in the season that the vaccine was about 23% effective. Among children, the vaccine offers even less protection, about 15%, the CDC said. The nasal spray vaccine may not protect children at all. One particular strain of H3N2 is causing most cases of flu in the United States so far this season. This strain was first seen in March 2014, the CDC said. That was too late to be included in the vaccine for this year. In most years, the flu vaccine is 50% to 70% effective. HealthDay News wrote about the CDC report February 26. 

Harvard Reviews of Health News

Eating tree nuts, peanuts and peanut butter may help people live longer, a new study suggests. The study looked at diet and death rates for more than 200,000 people. They were part of 3 long-term studies in China and the southeastern United States. The 2 Chin...

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